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A variety of vegetables
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Quality you can taste

South Tyrolean Vegetables

Vegetables are even tastier when they are grown in accordance with the strict requirements of the South Tyrolean seal of quality. In accordance with certain criteria, vegetables from South Tyrol have been permitted to bear the South Tyrolean seal of quality since 2005. South Tyrolean asparagus carries the seal since 2014.
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What are the most important quality criteria?

  • Regional cultivation
  • Outdoor cultivation
  • Cultivation above certain altitudes, which allows aromas and flavours to develop fully through slow ripening
  • Subject to regular checks by an independent inspection authority
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South Tyrolean vegetables and potatoes in numbers

400
agricultural businesses currently grow vegetables with the South Tyrolean seal of quality, mostly family businesses producing on the side.
Altitudes between 600 and 1,700
metres are used for growing vegetables with the South Tyrolean seal of quality.
More than 10,000
tonnes of vegetables with the South Tyrolean seal of quality are harvested by vegetable farmers every year. Potatoes and cauliflower account for the largest share.
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How are South Tyrolean vegetables grown?

Vegetables with the South Tyrolean seal of quality originate mainly from small family run farms. The plants are carefully grown in the open air and, with the exception of asparagus, grow at an altitude of at least 600 metres above sea level. This gives the vegetables plenty of time to develop their full flavours under the sun. This results in South Tyrolean vegetables that are not only crunchier and tastier, but also richer in vitamins and nutrients.

Which vegetables bear the South Tyrolean seal of quality?

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South Tyrolean cauliflower
Production area: mainly Laas/Lasa in the Vinschgau valley, but also the Eisacktal and Pustertal valleys and Ritten/Renon

Main nutrients and vitamins: potassium, folic acid, vitamins C, B5 and B6

Production volume: approx. 3,000 tonnes per year
sorten-eisbergsalat
South Tyrolean iceberg lettuce
Most important nutrients and vitamins: calcium, potassium, vitamin A

Production volume: approx. 350 tonnes per year
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South Tyrolean potatoes
Production area: Pustertal valley

Most important nutrients and vitamins: potassium, vitamin C

Good to know: potatoes contain fewer calories than other satiation supplements such as rice or noodles.

Production volume: approx. 6,000 tonnes per year
sorten-kohl
South Tyrolean cabbage and sauerkraut
Production area: mainly the Eisacktal, Pustertal and Vinschgau valleys

Most important nutrients and vitamins: vitamin C

Production volume: approx. 800 tonnes per year
sorten-radicchio
South Tyrolean radicchio
Production area: mainly the Pustertal and Vinschgau valleys

Main nutrients and vitamins: calcium, potassium, magnesium, vitamins A and C

Production volume: approx. 400 tonnes per year
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South Tyrolean asparagus
Production area: mainly the Etschtal valley

Main nutrients and vitamins: potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, calcium, iron, aspartic acid, vitamins A, C, E, B6, B2, B1

Production volume: approx. 70 tonnes per year
In addition to the varieties listed here, there are other vegetables, which are cultivated in smaller quantities, that also bear the South Tyrolean seal of quality.

The creators of South Tyrolean vegetables

Our producers

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OVEG
Vegetable & potatoes, Berries and cherries
39023 Eyrs/Oris
fragole
MEG
Vegetable & potatoes, Berries and cherries
39020 Martell/Martello